Leadership Articles

There’s a saying that goes, “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” suggesting that individuals working together are more effective and successful than if they were working alone. But what happens when working together doesn’t work?

The belief that working in teams makes us more creative and productive is so widespread that when faced with a challenging new task, leaders are quick to assume that teams are the best way to get the job done.

In part 1 of these series, we talked about ensuring you have a clear vision, understanding your work tactics, encouraging team building activities, and understanding that great teams are all about people. And in part 2 I showed you 6 more ways of building great teams.

In this article, I’ll be showing you the remaining 6 ways of building great teams.

In part 1 of these series, we talked about ensuring you have a clear vision, understanding your work tactics, encouraging team building activities, and understanding that great teams are all about people.

In this article, I’ll be showing you 6 more ways of building great teams.

Pele once said, “No individual can win a game by himself.” The first step to creating a good team is understanding that we cannot do it on our own, no matter how good we are or think we are. If we start to believe our own hype, then we will be limited to what we can achieve with our own hands.

In part 1 of these series, we talked about the seven stereotypes that are relevant in the pitch of an idea to a “buyer” who has not met us before and the first 2 steps that can help you pitch a brilliant idea.

In this article, I’ll be showing you the remaining 8 steps that can help you pitch a brilliant idea.

Ideas demand change. By definition, the application of an idea means that something different will take place in the universe. Even if your idea is undeniably and wonderfully brilliant, it will force someone, somewhere to change how they do something.

Management and leadership are different but complementary, and in a changing world, one cannot function without the other. Managers promote stability while leaders press for change and only organizations that embrace both sides of that contradiction can thrive in turbulent times.